Spotlight on … Professor James Woudhuysen

James-Woudhuysen

Professor James Woudhuysen

Professor James Woudhuysen helped to install Britain’s first computer-controlled car park in 1968, before graduating in physics. James has edited and written for many well-known industry magazines including Design and Blueprint Magazine, and also written numerous books on the subject of innovation. Prior to his role as independent forecaster and visiting professor, James was Chief of worldwide market intelligence for Philips Consumer Electronics in the Netherlands and Director of product designers at Seymourpowell.

 

You’re speaking again at PD+I 2016, what made you decide to get involved?
It’s always vibrant, with great speakers and a fresh, no-posing attitude to free speech and open debate.

 

What are you currently working on?
Manufacturing, IoT, rail travel, cybersecurity; co-editing, with Martyn Evans and James Moultrie, The Wiley Handbook of Design and Innovation: Trends, Scenarios and Recommendations for 2030 and beyond.

 

Why did you decide to work in the design field?
I needed a job and saw one in the papers – Technical Editor, Design magazine, at the Design Council. I asked my Dad if he wasn’t a designer. He said he was. From then on it was downhill

 

Is there a designer or company you particularly admire and why?
Ramesh Annapindi, MADLAB, Bangalore.
Should you meet your heroes?
I have heroes, but society tends to prefer celebrities. Mistake!

 

What product or design you wish you’d worked on and why?
Apollo 11. It’s obvious why.

 

What is the greatest challenge you face professionally?
As a forecaster, the challenge of staying ahead.

 

Can you describe yourself or your company in 10 words or less?
Speaker to big firms about the future of technological innovation.

 
PROF. JAMES WOUDHUYSEN WILL BE SPEAKING IN THE AFTERNOON OF FIRST DAY OF PD+I 2016. HIS KEYNOTE IS ENTITLED: CIRCULAR BUSINESS MODELS AND THE STRUGGLE FOR MANUFACTURING.

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Spotlight on … Gadi Amit

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Gadi Amit, President, NewDealDesign LLC

Gadi Amit is president and principal designer of NewDealDesign – the 2013 Cooper-Hewitt National Design Award Winner – and one of Fast Company magazine’s 1000 most creative people. Gadi has been responsible for projects including the Fitbit line of wearable devices, the Ara Modular Phone, the Lytro Light Field Camera, TYLT Devices, Whistle and Sproutling wearables. He was also named a ‘Master of Design’ in 2010 and alongside his team has received over 100 design awards.

 

You’re speaking at PD+I 2016, what made you decide to get involved?
I was involved with the 2014 conference and I am always very interested to see what’s happening all around the world in terms of innovation. The UK has a tremendous innovative community which always attracted me. Conferences are all about ideas and being exposed to new trends, and London always provides new inspirations and ideas, as well as the chance to meet interesting people.

 

What are you currently working on?
I’m working on a variety of projects, probably the most comprehensive ever. We’re currently dealing with products at the cutting edge of medicine, as well as autonomous objects – which are not limited to cars. We are also working on a variety of smart home devices and applications, nearly all of which are a combination of strategy, physical, digital and engineering. Most projects arrive as 360 degree engagement, so as well as design, brand strategy is important, and as well as the object, so too is the digital experience.

 

Why did you become a designer?
I don’t know that I had any other choice. I come from a family of two architects and discovered industrial design in my twenties. It’s my calling and I have never tried anything else.

 

Is there a designer or company you particularly admire and why?
It’s a complicated question. I am inspired by a few designers and find people like Naoto Fukasawa and Antonio Citterio to be very influential. There are a lot of very good designers out there, it’s hard to pick only a few when there are so many. I admire companies which take big chances and try to push boundaries, for example Elon Musk’s Tesla Motors. BMW is also picking up the green challenge with its i division, which is an impressive approach.

 

Should you meet your heroes?
I have met Naoto once or twice and Benoit Jacob from BMW I (at PD + I, by the way). I think there is a difference between the persona of a designer and a design itself. We shouldn’t personify design work. I have a slight reservation about design heroes and personification of designs. Some people have large, impressive personalities and some are much quieter, but that doesn’t impact the stature of work that they do.

 

What product or design do you wish you’d worked on and why?
I would wish for the chance to work on an autonomous vehicle or a house robot which everyone can use. The intelligence of moving things is a topic I am intrigued by.

 

What is the greatest challenge you face as a designer?
Advanced technology and the challenge to bridge the gap between humanity and technology which is typically non-human. We need to take culture and humanity seriously in design for tech. It is our greatest challenge, especially in terms of intelligent ‘things’. We need to make their assimilation into our culture much more smooth, so that they bring inspiration and happiness to humanity rather than mistrust.

 

Can you describe NewDealDesign in 10 words or less?
A technology design studio working to humanize technology for people.

 

GADI’S KEYNOTE PRESENTATION “HOW TECHNOLOGY DESIGN SHAPES A SMARTER FUTURE” TAKES PLACE AT THE PD+I 2016 CONFERENCE IN THE MORNING OF THE 1ST DAY- 18TH MAY

 

SPOTLIGHT ON… NIGEL GOODE

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Nigel Goode, Designer and Director, PriestmanGoode

Following a degree in product design at London’s Central Saint Martins, Goode worked for a number of large industrial design companies before joining Paul Priestman in 1989 to found PriestmanGoode.

Goode leads a wide range of projects across product and aviation design and has worked on major projects with Virgin Atlantic, Virgin Trains, Swiss International Airlines, Qatar Airways, BAA, Marks & Spencer, United Airlines and Boots.

Goode was external examiner at Central Saint Martins, on the product design course. He frequently speaks at design and aviation events around the world. He is also a regular commentator on trends and future thinking in air travel, covering everything from economy class cabins on commercial flights to space travel.

You’re speaking at PD+I 2016, what made you decide to get involved?

While the majority of PriestmanGoode’s work today is in aviation and transport design, my background is as a product designer, and product design remains at the heart of our company. We still use the same approach, the same attention to detail, just on a much larger scale. As the leading conference in the field, PD+I is a good opportunity to work with our contemporaries and set the agenda for the future of product design and innovation.
What are you currently working on?

We’re working on a number of large aviation and transport projects including for United Airlines, Qatar Airways and World View Experience with which we’re working on a space capsule for commercial flights to the edge of space. Having worked in aviation for many years, it’s great to now be part of the pioneering space travel industry.
Why did you become a designer?

I was always interested in how to improve products, how to make them better and more intuitive for people to use and more efficient for companies to manufacture. I find industrial design particularly interesting because it’s the perfect union of form and function.

Being resourceful is intrinsic to being a good product designer. The industry has developed a lot since I started out three decades ago. Today, design is at the heart of a company’s ability to gain competitive advantage and at PriestmanGoode we’re constantly working to develop a broader public understanding of the industry, and the value that design can bring to business.

It’s also rewarding to know that our work helps make people’s journeys around the world easier and more comfortable. The majority of PriestmanGoode’s work is in aviation and transport design, and it’s great to know that millions of passengers are using our products every year.
Is there a designer or company you particularly admire and why?

Product and industrial design is a fairly new profession, but I particularly admire early British design pioneers such as Ernest Race and Ken Grange who challenged the norm in terms of both design and manufacturing.
Should you meet your heroes?

There’s often a glamorising of the design industry when actually, it’s mostly about a lot of hard work.

Our company, PriestmanGoode, is one of the sponsors for the RSA Student Design Awards, and we regularly do workshops with students as part of the Sorrell Foundation’s National Art & Design Saturday Club. I think it’s important to build closer links between design education and practice, and for students to better understand the realities and challenges of working as a designer today.
What product or design do you wish you’d worked on and why?

The Toio lamp designed in 1962 by  Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglione for Flos. It’s a very economical and playful design based on an assemblage of bought items including a car headlight.
What is the greatest challenge you face as a designer?

Working in transport and aviation design is particularly rewarding, as whatever you design has to last, in the case of public transport design we’re talking up to fifty years. So, future thinking is at the heart of what we do, but the speed at which technology changes can be challenging because technological advancements happen much quicker than you can implement in transport design. This means that whatever we design needs to be flexible, so that upgrades can be made without too much cost or inconvenience.
Can you describe your company in 10 words or less?

Our designs help our clients become market leaders.

 

NIGEL’S KEYNOTE PRESENTATION “DESIGNING THE FUTURE OF SPACE TRAVEL” WILL TAKE PLACE AT THE PD+I 2016 CONFERENCE, IN THE AFTERNOON OF THE 2ND DAY- 19TH MAY 2016.